Sunday, December 05, 2004

Rich Dad, Poor Dad Reviews

Amazon.com
Personal-finance author and lecturer Robert Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective through exposure to a pair of disparate influences: his own highly educated but fiscally unstable father, and the multimillionaire eighth-grade dropout father of his closest friend. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" (whose weekly paychecks, while respectable, were never quite sufficient to meet family needs) pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad" (that "the poor and the middle class work for money," but "the rich have money work for them"). Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. Rich Dad, Poor Dad, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his the philosophy behind his relationship with money. Although Kiyosaki can take a frustratingly long time to make his points, his book nonetheless compellingly advocates for the type of "financial literacy" that's never taught in schools. Based on the principle that income-generating assets always provide healthier bottom-line results than even the best of traditional jobs, it explains how those assets might be acquired so that the jobs can eventually be shed. --Howard Rothman

--Zig Ziglar, world-renowned author and lecturer
"To get over the top financially, you must read RICH DAD, POOR DAD. It's common sense and market savvy for your financial future."

--Mark Victor Hansen, co-author of the #1 Chicken Soup for the Soul series
"If you want all insider wisdom on how to personally get and STAY rich, read this book! Bribe your kids (financially, if you have to) to do the same."





Friday, December 03, 2004

Rich Dad, Poor Dad - Robert Kiyosaki

I had two dads - a rich one and a poor one.
One dad was highly educated and intelligent; he had a Ph.D. and had completed four years of under-graduate work in less than two years. He then went to Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and Northwestern University to do his advanced studies. All on full, financial scholarships.
My other dad never finished the eighth grade.
Both men were successful in their careers, working hard all their lives. Both earned substantial incomes.
Yet one dad struggled financially all his life and the other dad would become one of the richest men in Hawaii.
One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities, and his church. The other left a legacy of unpaid bills.
Both men were strong, charismatic, and influential. Both men offered me advice, but they did not advise the same things.
Having two dads as advisors offered me the perspective of contrasting points of view: one of a rich man and one of a poor man. The problem was that my rich dad was not yet rich, and my poor dad not yet poor. Both were just starting out in their careers; both were struggling with money and families.
But, regardless of those facts, both had very different points of view on the subject of money.
One dad would say, "The love of money is the root of all evil." The other, "The lack of money is the root of all evil." Having two dads ?and loving them both ?forced me to think about, and ultimately choose, a way of thinking for myself.
I had to think about each dad's advice and, in doing so, gained valuable insights into the power and effect of one's thoughts on one's life. For example: My poor dad had a habit of saying, "I can't afford it." My rich dad forbade those words to be used. He insisted that I say, "How can I afford it?" One is a statement, the other a question. One lets you off the hook; the other forces you to think. My rich dad would explain that by automatically saying the words "I can't afford it" your brain stops working. By asking the question "How can I afford it?" your brain is put to work.
My rich dad did not mean 'buy everything you wanted.' He was, though, fanatical about exercising your mind ?the most powerful computer in the world. My rich dad said: "My brain gets stronger every day because I exercise it. The stronger it gets, the more money I can make." He believed that automatically saying "I can't afford it" was a sign of mental laziness.
Although both dads worked hard, I noticed that my Poor Dad had a habit of putting his brain to sleep when it came to money matters. My Rich Dad, on the other hand, made a habit of exercising his brain. The long-term result was that one dad grew stronger financially and the other grew weaker.
Being a product of two strong dads allowed me the luxury of observing the effects that different thoughts have on one's life. I noticed that people really do shape their lives through their thoughts.
The power of our thoughts may never be measured or appreciated, but it became obvious to me as a young boy that there was value and power in being aware of my thoughts and how I expressed myself. I noticed that my poor dad was poor not because of the amount of money he earned ?which was significant ?but because of his thoughts and actions. As a young boy having two fathers I became acutely aware of being careful in deciding which thoughts I chose to adopt as my own and to whom should I listen ?my rich dad or my poor dad?
At the age of nine I decided to listen to and learn from my rich dad about money. In doing so, I chose not to listen to my poor dad ?my real dad ?even though he was the one with all the college degrees.
One of my dads is a multi-millionaire. The other is a poor man. Why? Very simply, it comes down to their respective attitudes toward money and life. Take a look at the differences…and think about where you fit…

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About Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki is an investor, entrepreneur, educator, and author. Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American.
After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for the Xerox Corporation and then in 1977 he started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world.
In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47.
During his short-lived retirement, Robert wrote the #1 NY Times best-selling book Rich Dad Poor Dad, which to date has sold over 20 million copies worldwide. The success of Rich Dad Poor Dad paved the way for the Rich Dad series of books - currently ten books in total. Most all of these books have earned spots on the bestseller lists of the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, USA Today and others.
Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW ® 101 - to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47. Hundreds of "CASHFLOW Clubs," independent of The Rich Dad® Company, have sprung up throughout the world. Thousands of people get together on a regular basis and play CASHFLOW 101.
In Robert's words,
"We go to school to learn to work hard for money. I write books and create products that teach people how to have money work hard for them. Then they can enjoy the luxuries of this great world we live in."

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Welcome to Robert Kiyosaki!

Welcome to Robert Kiyosaki!

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